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Inventing tomorrow’s assistive technology

Alexandre Campeau-Lecours and his team focus on the needs of individuals to develop robotics and mechatronics technology that helps people living with physical disabilities perform daily activities.

Project architects

Alexandre Campeau-Lecours

Assistant professor at the Faculty of Science and Engineering (Mechanical Engineering Department)
Member of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Rehabilitation and Social Integration (CIRRIS) and the Université Laval Robotics Laboratory

Team

PhD: Sy Nguyen Tan
Master's: Gabrielle Lemire, Philippe Turgeon, Samuel Poirier, Frédéric Schweitzer, Michaël Dubé, Marianne Boyer
Bachelor's: Jade Clouâtre, Charles Larouche
Research engineers: Alexandre Desgagné-Lebeuf, Thierry Laliberté

Developing assistive technology

Alexandre Campeau-Lecours and his team develop robotics and mechatronics technology to help people living with physical disabilities eat, drink, and write. Working closely with rehabilitation specialists and healthcare professionals, they create prototypes designed to match each person’s individual needs as closely as possible. They then put the prototypes through a battery of tests in real-life situations to measure performance and work towards the best possible solution.

Creating smarter assistive robots

Professor Campeau-Lecours and his team are also working to improve the capabilities of robots designed for use by people living with physical disabilities. They are working in 2 main areas: helping robots be smarter by better understanding their surroundings; and developing human/machine interfaces that use various means of control (e.g., voice, head movements) and are tailored to the abilities of their users.

Making rehabilitation easier

Alexandre Campeau-Lecours’s team uses a variety of sensors (inertial sensors, muscle activity sensors) to assess a patient’s condition outside the laboratory and track their progress over time, among other things. Professor Campeau-Lecours is currently testing wheelchair comfort with a view to improving design. Using sensors placed on the wheelchair and on the wheelchair user’s body, his team reconstructs their movements and analyzes any impacts they experience while using the chair.

A boy in a wheelchair practices his motor skills.

This new technology will help people living with diseases such as cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease.

Alexandre Campeau-Lecours and his team meet regularly.

Alexandre Campeau-Lecours and his team work with engineers, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and kinesitherapists.

A man shakes hands with his coworker in a meeting.

People who use the device can bring food up to their mouth without spilling it.

What's next

People who use the device can brProfessor Campeau-Lecours and his team will be busy with multiple projects over the next 5 years. For example, they’ll be developing arm supports to stabilize movement and make it easier to do things like write by hand or do DIY projects. They’ll also develop technology such as exoskeletons, based, according to need, on robotic, mechanical systems and on artificial intelligence.ng food up to their mouth without spilling it.

Alexandre Campeau-Lecours

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